Publication Date

2006

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Sorensen, Christine Knupp

Degree Name

Ed.D. (Doctor of Education)

Department

Department of Teaching and Learning

LCSH

Middle school students||Study skills||Academic achievement

Abstract

Many research studies indicate that neither social promotion nor retention is an effective strategy to help at-risk students. Homework support is one method some schools have taken to help at-risk students. The purpose of this study was to determine if teaching students study skills impacted their ability to maintain adequate academic progress to a greater extent then simply providing homework support. One hundred and ninety-seven students participated in the study. These students had failed at least one academic subject and were considered at risk. Participants were assigned to either an after-school program that focused on homework completion only or an after-school program that focused on homework completion with the teaching of study skills. Data were collected using student report card grades over three quarters of the school year. No statistical difference was found between students receiving homework completion support only and those receiving additional study skills instruction.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages [102]-111).

Extent

vii, 222 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

Share

COinS