Publication Date

2008

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Wilkins, Elizabeth A.

Degree Name

Ed.D. (Doctor of Education)

Department

Department of Teaching and Learning

LCSH

Educational technology--Illinois--Cook County--Case studies||Catholic elementary schools--Illinois--Cook County--Case studies

Abstract

The purpose of this phenomenological case study was to examine perceived differences of student learning and attitude toward learning when computer technology was integrated into a 4th grade classroom. The case consists of a purposive sample of 4th grade parents, students, and K-8 teachers in a Catholic suburban school who experienced daily classroom use of integrated computer technology. The parents', students', and teachers' perceptions of the impact of using this integrated technology are explored. Four research questions address recall and perceptions of how student learning was impacted, participant reactions to the experience, benefits and challenges of changing teaching and learning tools, and the learning community disposition toward increased integrated technology use. In this qualitative study, data were collected through in-depth interviews, surveys, and video clips of learning activities in the classroom. Data gathered were analyzed to identify common themes. The study reveals: (1) Parents seek relevant and motivating learning opportunities for their children. Further, they believe that engaging learning activities develop student self-confidence, enthusiasm, and life-long interest in learning. (2) Students seek independence in the learning process, an opportunity to cooperatively learn, and creative “real-world” opportunities to demonstrate knowledge. (3) Teachers seek professional development programs that provide for differentiation of instruction, and these programs are conducted within an experiential framework. Teachers also seek a clear purpose and ongoing support for change in classroom practice. (4) A need exists for ongoing dialogue and support for new learning initiatives as they are implemented in classrooms.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages [208]-213)

Extent

xii, 249 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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