Publication Date

2004

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Johnson, Donald R., 1941-

Degree Name

Ed.D. (Doctor of Education)

Department

Department of Leadership, Educational Psychology and Foundations

LCSH

Community colleges--Illinois||Internet in education--Illinois||Distance education--Illinois

Abstract

Regarding on-line classes, what is the state of the current situation and the status of changes from the view of three groups of community college personnel: administrators, faculty who have been and/or are currently involved with preparation and teaching on-line classes, and faculty who have not been involved with preparation and teaching on-line classes? Regarding on-line classes, what are the institutional encouragements from the administrative and faculty view? Regarding on-line classes, what are the institutional discouragements from the administrative and faculty view? All 48 Illinois community colleges received six surveys which were distributed to two administrators, two faculty who have been or currently are involved with preparation and teaching on-line classes, and two faculty who have not been involved with preparation and teaching on-line classes. Out of the total number of responses, the percentage of those that responded were 36% administrators, 36% faculty with experience, and 28% faculty without experience. Possible discouragements were found when 48% felt the pre-assessment of students' technological skills is not present, but it is important to the success of on-line classes. A total of 77% reported the preassessment is important, while 29% recorded that it was present in their institution. When discussing the need and use of a master plan for on-line classes, 78% reported that it is important, 44% indicated it was important and present in their institution. Encouragements included 93% of the respondents reporting that technological support for faculty was important and evident in their institution. Respondents stated that 74% of the institutions have faculty driven curricula for their on-line classes. It appears that 54% of the responding colleges do not have a budgetary line for on-line classes. Administrators should accept the concept of cost accounting for on-line classes. If they do not have a separate line in the budget, it would be hard to determine if they are making money, losing money, or breaking even with these courses. Although an institution of higher education is dedicated to teaching adults, they still must be concerned with staying maintaining a positive budget.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages [88]-93).

Extent

xi, 111 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

Share

COinS