Publication Date

1999

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Parker, Chris P.

Degree Name

M.A. (Master of Arts)

Department

Department of Psychology

LCSH

Employees--Attitudes||Self-evaluation||Work environment--Psychological aspects||Job satisfaction--Psychological aspects||Employees--Psychology

Abstract

This study investigated the application of the functional approach to attitudes to the domain o f job satisfaction. Due to expected differences in the function o f job attitudes, it was posited that the individual difference variable o f self-monitoring would moderate the effects o f task enrichment and the presence o f positive social cues on both perceptions o f job characteristics and job satisfaction. In particular, task enrichment was hypothesized to have a greater positive influence for persons classified as low selfmonitors relative to high self-monitors on both dependent variables o f perceptions o f job characteristics and job satisfaction. In contrast, the presence o f positive social cues was hypothesized to have a greater positive effect for high self-monitors relative to low selfmonitors on both perceptions o f job characteristics and job satisfaction. Two additional exploratory hypotheses were included regarding the moderating effects o f two personality difference variables: growth need strength and negative affectivity. It was predicted that the three-way interaction between the social cue manipulation, task enrichment manipulation, and self-monitoring would be stronger for persons high in growth need strength (relative to low) and for persons low in negative affectivity (relative to high). None o f the hypotheses were supported. However, there was an interesting interaction between negative affectivity, self-monitoring, and the two manipulations. Both manipulations o f social cue and task enrichment were stronger for persons who were high in negative affectivity and low self-monitors (relative to persons who were high in negative affectivity and high self-monitors) and for persons who were low in negative affectivity and high self-monitors (relative to persons who were low in negative affectivity and low self-monitors).

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages [65]-69).

Extent

vi, 107 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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