Author

David Tews

Publication Date

2006

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Giordano, Francesca G.

Degree Name

Ed.D. (Doctor of Education)

Department

Department of Counseling, Adult and Higher Education

LCSH

Hispanic American men--Sexual behavior||Condom use

Abstract

Existing research indicates that there is a relationship between oppression, racism, and poverty and difficult sexual situations among Latino men who have sex with men (MSM). These individuals practice unsafe sex in order to alleviate feelings of low self-esteem. Experiences of Latino MSM were studied to determine whether there was a relationship between comfort with cultural identity, self-esteem, and condom use and other lower risk sexual behaviors. More research is needed to determine the degree to which comfort with cultural identity and self-esteem are related to condom use and other sexual risk behaviors among this specific population. One hundred Latino men participated in the study. Participants completed an eight-page survey ($10.00 compensation) over a two-month period. Overall, respondents indicated high levels of self-esteem and comfort with cultural identity. Nearly half of the respondents reported having six or more sexual partners during the past 12 months. Respondents varied in their reports of unprotected insertive and receptive anal sex without use of a condom. A step-wise regression found a relationship between comfort with cultural identity, self-esteem, and number of partners and insertive anal sex without a condom. No significant relationship was found between the predictor variables and receptive anal sex without a condom. The results of the study do support theories that there is some relationship between comfort with cultural identity, self-esteem, and condom use and number of partners among Latino MSM. However, the relationship is weak, and more work needs to be done to explore reasons why Latino MSM continue to practice high-risk sexual behaviors. The results indicate that for the population studied, high levels of self-esteem and comfort with cultural identity do exist among a group who is considered to be marginalized and oppressed. Future studies should examine other specific cultural characteristics and the effect these characteristics have on high-risk sexual behavior in order that specific HIV prevention measures may be tailored to this at-risk population.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages [83]-87).

Extent

viii, 101 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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