Publication Date

1976

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Matthews, Lillian B.||Keim, Robert E., 1929-||Paek, Soae Lee

Degree Name

M.S. (Master of Science)

Department

Department of Home Economics

LCSH

Teenage girls||Adjustment (Psychology)||Self-perception

Abstract

The study was concerned with eighth grade girls' self concept and personal adjustment as related to their self evaluation of facial attractiveness, their friends' and classmates' facial attractiveness, and the estimated response to their teachers' opinions to their facial attractiveness. Fifty six students were given the California Test of Personality to measure their self concept and personal adjustment and the Self Evaluation of Facial Attractiveness Ladder Scale to measure their response toward their own facial attractiveness, their friends' and classmates' facial attractiveness, and their estimated response of their teachers' opinions to their facial appearance. When measured by the Chi-square test, no significant difference was found between the degree of facial attractiveness of the self and that of class members. However, there was a significant difference between how the students perceived the teachers as rating their facial attractiveness and how they rated their own facial attractiveness. Chi-square test also indicated that friends are not perceived as having more attractive facial features than the self. Further analysis accepted the hypothesis that those students who rate their facial attractiveness equal to or greater than that of their friends, will not rate higher on self concept than those who rate their facial appearance less than that of their friends. Those who rated their facial attractiveness equal to or more attractive than their friends did not rate higher on personal adjustment. These findings did not agree with those of Musa and Roach (1973) who found girls who rated their appearance as equal to peers’ appearance were associated with most favorable personal adjustment. However, it is to be noted that the subjects for the Musa and Roach study were older (eleventh grade) than the subjects for this study (eighth grade).

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

vi, 43 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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