Publication Date

2016

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Shin, E-yung

Degree Name

Ed.D. (Doctor of Education)

Department

Department of Leadership, Educational Psychology and Foundations

LCSH

Elementary school teachers--Illinois--Attitudes||Curriculum change--Illinois||Language arts (Elementary)--Curricula--Standards--Illinois||Mathematics--Curricula--Standards--Illinois||Educational leadership||Elementary education||Curriculum development

Abstract

The purpose of this mixed-method study was to examine elementary teacher perceptions of mandated curriculum change. In the spring and fall of 2015, Illinois elementary school teachers in a north suburban school district participated in a focus group, an online survey, and follow-up interviews to gather data about teachers' perceptions of the mandated curriculum change process in implementing the Common Core State Standards in English language arts and mathematics. The study also sought to find any differences between the perceptions of teachers in kindergarten through fifth grade classrooms and those who taught in sixth- through eighth-grade classrooms. This study was based on a conceptual framework that included three different theorists, which provided a comprehensive lens to review the data: Knowles's Adult Learning Theory; Fullan's Three-Tier Change Process; and Au, Raphael, and Mooney's Model for Standards-Based Change. Using the combined work of these three theorists, three key overlapping components were validated within this research when implementing a school or district-mandated curriculum change.

Comments

Advisors: E-yung Shin.||Committee members: Joseph Flynn; Michael Manderino.

Extent

146 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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