Publication Date

2018

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Rademaker, Kurt M.

Degree Name

M.A. (Master of Arts)

Department

Department of Anthropology

LCSH

Archaeology||Museums--Study and teaching

Abstract

This multidisciplinary project focuses on the concepts of fakes, forgeries, altered objects, and authenticity. I applied noninvasive methodologies to study three Etruscan stone sarcophagi in the collections of the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. These techniques included detection of fluorescent pigments using ultraviolet light and portable x-ray fluorescence to determine the elemental composition of the pigments. Measurements suggest possible minerals used in original Etruscan pigments as well as subsequent non-Etruscan pigments and putty applied to these artifacts. Combined with the objects' history and iconographical analysis, this study provides a holistic and comprehensive analysis of these artifacts. Ultimately, this research reveals a new category of objects that are both authentic and modified, and they should not be eliminated from collections but serve to broaden our concept of authenticity and expand scholarly knowledge into new avenues.

Comments

Advisors: Kurt Rademaker.||Committee members: Sinclair Bell; Jennifer Kirker.||Includes illustrations and map.||Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

120 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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