Publication Date

2016

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Wilkins, Elizabeth A.

Degree Name

Ed.D. (Doctor of Education)

Department

Department of Literacy and Elementary Education

LCSH

English teachers--Training of||High school teachers--Training of||Literacy--Study and teaching (Secondary)||English language--Rhetoric--Study and teaching (Secondary)

Abstract

The purpose of this exploratory qualitative study was to examine pre-service high school English teachers' instructional experiences with formative assessment while student teaching. Participants were gathered using a web-based questionnaire, the Pre-Service Teacher Assessment Literacy Questionnaire, regarding assessment literacy skills. The study focused on five pre-service teachers enrolled in Midwestern universities who participated in five one-hour interviews and two 45-minute non-evaluative observations during the student teaching experience. Data from the questionnaire, interview, and observation data collection tools were analyzed using qualitative methods and through the theoretical lens of adult learning theory, theories of human development, and hermeneutic theory. Three key findings emerged from the study. Assessment literacy needs have shifted from one of knowing about assessment to one of doing assessment as a required role of teaching. Also, findings include that the act of assessment is how pre-service teachers best learn assessment literacy skills. Finally, a stronger foundation in assessment literacy skills is needed at the pre-service teacher level; needs include increased knowledge base, emphasis on content area standards, and clearer purpose of assessment. Recommendations for the field and for future research are also presented.

Comments

Advisors: Elizabeth A. Wilkins.||Committee members: Vicki Collins; Hidetada Shimizu.||Includes bibliographical references.||Includes illustrations.

Extent

x, 234 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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