Publication Date

2003

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Torok, Andrew G.

Degree Name

Ed.D. (Doctor of Education)

Department

Department of Educational Technology, Research and Assessment

LCSH

Early childhood educators--Illinois--Attitudes||Teaching--Aids and devices--Public Opinion

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine early childhood educators' attitudes toward and knowledge about computers in the classroom. A usable sample of 391 participants was drawn from early childhood educators attending two different, one-day early childhood conferences in Northern Illinois. A 24-item Likert-scaled instrument was designed to assess attitudes and knowledge items about computers in a classroom. Results indicated that early childhood educators had a neutral to positive attitude toward computers and were neutral to slightly agreeable about being knowledgeable about computers in an early childhood classroom. Early childhood educators aged 18–30 had more positive attitudes toward computer use than did those aged 41–50 years. Also, educators who used computers in their classroom had a more positive attitude toward computers and perceived themselves as more knowledgeable about computers than did those who did not use a computer in the classroom. Educators who worked in full-day daycare centers and Head Start programs had more positive attitudes toward computers and perceived themselves as more knowledgeable about computers than did those who worked in half-day preschool groups. Also, those educators who worked with children three years old and older were more aware of computer curriculum guidelines than were those educators working with children two years old and younger. Early childhood educators with more positive attitudes toward computers being used in the classroom believed that children should start using computers at a younger age. Those educators who perceived they had more knowledge about computers being used in the classroom thought children should start using computers at a younger age. Also, those educators who used computers in their classroom were more likely to think that children should start using computers at a younger age than did those educators who did not use computers in their classrooms. Additionally, educators who used computers more frequently in the classroom were more likely to believe that computers should be introduced to children at a younger age. Finally, early childhood educators believed that four years should be the age children should be introduced to computers. The findings are discussed in terms of recommendations for practical applications.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages [100]-105)

Extent

ix, 114 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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