Author

He Qin

Publication Date

2016

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Shin, Eui-kyung

Degree Name

Ed.D. (Doctor of Education)

Department

Department of Literacy and Elementary Education

LCSH

Chinese students--Education (Higher)--United States||Chinese American college students--Education (Higher)--United States||Civics, Chinese||Citizenship--Study and teaching (Higher)--United States||Social sciences education||Curriculum development||Multicultural education

Abstract

There has been a rapid increase of the Chinese immigrant youths enrolling in U.S. higher educational institutions. The question of how college-level Chinese immigrant youths develop their citizenship is critical to American educators in order to provide better civic preparation. The present mixed-method study investigated Chinese immigrant youths' citizenship development in areas of identity, attitudes, engagement, and knowledge. The participants were over 100 college-level Chinese youths who were born abroad or whose parents were born abroad. In Phase I of the study, a Modified Nominal Group Technique (MNGT) explored the characteristics of different developmental areas of citizenship among the participants. One-on-one telephone interviews were conducted to explain how life experiences influence citizenship development. Phase II of the study utilized an on-line survey which investigated the relationships between the identities and citizenship development. Result of this research shows that Chinese immigrant youths have unique development of citizenship. The feelings of belonging to the cultural community and the national state were associated with different development aspects. The research helps American educators understand how youth citizenship development is influenced by cultures and the different understandings of good citizenry across social groups.

Comments

Advisors: Eui-kyung Shin.||Committee members: Mary Beth Henning; Brent E. Wholeben.

Extent

200 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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