Publication Date

1990

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Chibucos, Thomas R.

Degree Name

M.S. (Master of Science)

Department

Department of Human and Family Resources

LCSH

Discipline of children||Parent and child||Aggressiveness in children

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between aversive parental disciplinary techniques and aggressive behavior by the child. Social learning theory stresses the importance of children learning through imitating or modeling the behavior of others. Because parents are the most influential models during a child's early formative years, it is likely that parents who use aversive disciplinary techniques will have children who will display more aggressive behavior. In addition, this aggressive pattern continues to play a part in the psychological makeup of the individual child after reaching adulthood. The questionnaire used in this study was distributed at Northern Illinois University to 13 classes in education, business, and human and family resources in 1985. The questionnaire was adapted from the Conflict Tactics Scale and provided information to test the following hypotheses: Hypothesis I: Adult children who report that their parents used more aversive control measures recall that they engaged in more aggressive behavior as children compared with adult children who report their parents used less aversive control measures. Hypothesis II: Adult children who report that their parents used more aversive control measures recall that they experienced more sibling conflict compared to adult children who report their parents used less aversive control measures. Hypothesis III: Adult children who report that their parents used more aversive control measures select more aggressive responses to parental and interpersonal hypothetical situations compared with adult children who report their parents used less aversive control measures. The chi-square and Somer's d statistics were used to analyze the data. The results supported the hypotheses that adult children who report that their parents used more aversive control measures recall that they engaged in more aggressive behavior as children and experienced more sibling conflict. Also, the study provides some support for the hypothesis that adult children who report that their parents used more aversive control measures are more aggressive as adults. Recommendations for future studies include using a different population sample including respondents other than college students and refining the instrument to increase reliability.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages [50]-59)

Extent

vi, 89 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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