Publication Date

2017

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Ozier, Amy D.

Degree Name

M.S. (Master of Science)

Department

Department of Health Studies

LCSH

Psychology||Nutrition||Neurosciences

Abstract

A vast amount of research exists on the associations between personality disorders in individuals with eating disorders, despite controversy surrounding the validity of such diagnoses. Though pathological personalities in those with eating disorders have been examined in depth, little research exists on the associations between non-pathological personality type and eating disorders. Therefore, this study sought to examine associations between Myers-Briggs Personality Type dimensions and eating disorder type and duration. A cumulative 51 participants (49 women, 2 men), ages 18-62, with a current or past history of a diagnosed or suspected eating disorder were recruited for participation in the study. Each participant completed the Myers-Briggs Personality Type assessment (Form M) in addition to an Eating Disorder History and Demographic Survey. The associations between each of the four Myers-Briggs Personality Type dimensions and eating disorder types and duration were examined using binary logistical regression tests, revealing no significant associations between the extroverted vs. introverted, intuitive vs. sensing, and thinking vs. feeling dimensions and eating disorder type. However, a significant association was found between the judging vs. perceiving dimension and anorexia nervosa (p=0.028). Further, no significant association was found between Myers-Briggs Personality Type dimensions and eating disorder duration. These findings suggest that the judging vs. perceiving dimension of Myers-Briggs Personality Type may be a unique aspect of personality to explore in individuals with anorexia nervosa. The findings also imply that non-pathological personality type may be a useful tool for eating disorder practitioners to explore when providing care to patients, given that it may provide insight into treatment modalities that may be more likely to work for certain patients, given aspects of their specific non-pathological personality type.

Comments

Advisors: Amy Ozier.||Committee members: Sarah Cosbey; Lan Li.||Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

iv, 101 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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