Publication Date

1965

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Maxwell, Lyle||Ogilvie, William K.

Degree Name

M.S. (Master of Science)

Department

Department of Business Education

LCSH

Business education--Curricula

Abstract

Problem The purpose of this study was to compare the business offerings at the Illinois community colleges with those of selected community colleges of California, Florida, New York, and Texas. The number, type, range and hours of business courses were compared. A comparison was also made of the business occupational curriculum. Procedure An analysis was made of current literature publishes since 1954 pertaining to business curriculum in the community college. The study was limited to community colleges found in those states with greater numbers of community colleges than Illinois. Catalogs from the 19 Illinois community colleges and eight each from the states of California, Florida, New York, and Texas were secured and analyzed,. Conclusions were drawn as based on the interpretation of the data. Findings and Conclusions 1. With the exception of office skills, the course offerings of non-Illinois community colleges was as great or greater than the Illinois community colleges' offerings any other area of business education. 2. All of the institutions invoiced in this study offered accounting courses. The maximum number of hours offered by any community collage involved in the study was 56. The mean number of hours in accounting offered by Illinois community colleges was 14.68 while that of the non-Illinois community colleges was 18.10. 3. Business data processing was offered by 31.6 percent of the Illinois schools and by 53.1 percent of the non-Illinois community colleges. The greatest number of hours offered in this field by an Illinois community college was 54 and 47 by a California community college. The mean number of hours in business data processing offered by Illinois community colleges was 8.79 while that of the non-Illinois community colleges was 8.50. 4. Courses in distributive education were offered by 73.7 percent of the Illinois schools and 87.5 percent of the non-Illinois institutions. The greatest range of hours offered in distributive education was 11 to 15 by five Illinois schools. The greatest number of hours in this field offered by a non-Illinois institution was 76. The mean number of hours in distributive education by Illinois schools was 5.84 while that of the non-Illinois institutions was 14.00. 5. All of the community colleges selected for study offered work in economics. Three Illinois schools offered 15 credits while one non-Illinois school offered 18 hours in economics. The mean number of hours in economics offered by Illinois community colleges was 10.11 while 8.16 was the equivalent figure for community colleges located outside of Illinois. 6. Finance was offered by 36.8 percent of the Illinois colleges as compared to 62.5 percent of the other colleges. The range of six to ten course hours was the most frequently offered in finance by all selected colleges for study. The mean number of hours in finance offered by Illinois community colleges was 2.42 while that of the non-Illinois community colleges was 1.97. 7. No Illinois community college offered courses in hospitality education while 12.5 percent of the other schools did offer course work in this field. The mean number of hours in hospitality education offered by the non-Illinois schools was 2.55. 8. Insurance was offered by 26.3 percent of the Illinois community colleges and by 37.5 percent of the other community colleges. The mean number of hours in insurance offered by Illinois community colleges was 3.67. 9. Management and/or supervision courses were offered by 47.4 percent of the Illinois two-year institutions while 71.9 percent of the non-Illinois schools offered courses in this area. Of the Illinois community colleges that did offer work in the area of management and supervision, none provided more than 13 hours. The mean number of hours in management and/or supervision offered by Illinois schools was 5.37 while that of the non-Illinois schools was 8.73. 10. Office skill courses were offered by 100 percent of the Illinois schools and 96.9 percent of the non-Illinois schools. No Illinois community college offered more than 54 hours in the area of office skills. Respectively, two California community colleges offered 101 and 110 hours in office skills. The mean number of hours in office skills offered by Illinois community colleges was 31.53 while that of the non-Illinois community colleges was 39.88. 11. Real estate courses were offered by 15.8 percent of the Illinois community colleges as compared to one-half of the other community colleges involved in the study. One Illinois community college offered 18 credits whereas the most offered by a non-Illinois community college was 63. The mean number of hours in real estate offered by Illinois community colleges was 1.21 while the mean number of hours offered by non-Illinois schools was 7.66. 12. Transportation courses were offered by one of the Illinois and four of the non-Illinois community colleges. The only Illinois community college to offer such courses provided 19 hours. One California community college offered 42 hours of instruction in this field. The mean number of hours in transportation offered by Illinois community colleges was 1.00 while that of the non-Illinois schools was 3.63. 13. All Illinois community colleges provided a secretarial science curriculum. The next four most frequently offered business occupational curriculums were general business, accounting, business administration, and business data processing. The number of different business occupational programs listed in the Illinois catalogs was 19. 14. The five most often listed business occupational curriculums in non-Illinois community colleges were secretarial science, business administration, accounting, general business, and medical secretarial. Different business curriculums listed in non-Illinois catalogs numbered 35. 15. Secretarial or stenographic one-year training programs were listed 19 times by the total 51 community college examined. 16. The non-business curriculum most often requiring business subjects was pre-law. Economics was required by 16 pre-law programs and accounting by 13.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

x, 63 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

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Text

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