Publication Date

2002

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Sorensen, Christine Knupp

Degree Name

Ed.D. (Doctor of Education)

Department

Department of Teaching and Learning

LCSH

Christian universities and colleges--United States--Curricula||Church music--Instruction and study--United States||Music in universities and colleges--United States

Abstract

This dissertation investigated the use of contemporary congregational music in undergraduate sacred music programs. It went beyond earlier studies conducted by Pflueger, Dunbar, and Breland. A content analysis was used to examine catalogues from 67 member institutions of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities that offer an undergraduate degree in sacred music. A survey instrument was created and mailed to these 67 institutions, one per institution. Fifty-five professors responded, using a 4-point Likert scale, rating 16 course elements for current and desired use. The findings answered these research questions: (1) What courses are currently offered in undergraduate sacred music programs among the member institutions of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities? (2) To what extent do professors of sacred music report use of contemporary congregational music in undergraduate sacred music program curricula? (3) What degree of importance do the faculty attach to the elements of contemporary congregational music in the curriculum? (4) Is there a difference in faculty perception of current and desired inclusion of elements of contemporary congregational music in undergraduate sacred music program curricula? (5) How do these findings compare to earlier studies in this area? Content analysis results indicated that comparative religions, relationship of sacred music with other art forms and with music of the general culture, contemporary congregational music ensemble, and improvisation were present in about one third of the programs. Jazz, orchestra, senior recital, worship orders, church history, church administration, organ, band, guitar, hymnology, piano proficiency, and internships were present in two thirds or more of the programs. Voice, piano, choir, and conducting were present in 100% of the programs. In the survey, faculty rated practica, relationship between sacred music and music of the general culture, church administration, worship orders, vocal training, and conducting for high current and desired inclusion. Guitar, imitating popular styles, and contemporary congregational music ensembles were rated for low current and desired inclusion. Arranging music for contemporary ensembles, reading and playing from charts, improvisation, song leading, interrelationship with other art forms, and praise and worship choruses in hymnology courses were rated for low current and high desired inclusion.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages [126]-133).

Extent

[xv], 155 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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