Publication Date

1968

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Hellmich, Eugene W. (Eugene William), 1902-||McKenzie, Harvey C.

Degree Name

M.S. Ed. (Master of Education)

Department

Department of Mathematics

LCSH

Algebra--Study and teaching||Geometry--Study and teaching

Abstract

This study had two purposes which were: 1. to determine the algebra that is used in the study of tenth year geometry; and 2. to determine if this algebra was retained over the summer vacation, a time span of three and one-half months. In order to determine the algebra that is used in tenth year geometry, five geometry textbooks that are in current use were examined. The algebra found on the printed pages in these textbooks was listed and grouped into various categories. In order to determine if the algebra was retained over the summer vacation, a test was constructed from the algebra found in the five geometry textbooks. This test was read by a panel of nine mathematics teachers at Naperville Community High School, Naperville, Illinois. After their suggestions had been incorporated, the test was given to an experimental group of thirty students who were studying elementary algebra at Naperville Community High School. The answer sheets of this group were scored, and an item analysis was performed on the obtained scores. Several revisions were made after this analysis was conducted. The final form of the test consisted of fifty items and was given on May 29, 1967, and again on September 7, 1967. Two hundred and sixty-three students at Naperville Community High School were tested on these dates. The test was divided into three sections which were: section I, consisting of items on sets and properties; section II, consisting of items on fractions, square roots and simplifying radicals, absolute value, and evaluation of expressions; and section III, consisting of items on graphing, solving of equations, and working with formulas. The number of correct responses on each of these sections and on the total test was calculated. These scores were treated by means of a t-test for paired observations. A "t" of 11.5 was found on section I of the test which was significant at the 1% level of confidence. A "t" of 11.5 was found on section II of the test which was significant at the 1% level. A "t" of 10.8 was found on section III of the test which was significant at the 1% level of confidence. A "t" of 18.3 was found on the total scores which was significant at the 1% level of confidence. The percent retained and lost on the topics of the test was also determined. These evaluated percents showed that students did not retain well the topics of square root and simplifying radicals, the solving of fractional equations, and the solving of quadratic equations. The percents lost on these topics were 26.8, 23.9, and 39.5 respectively. Also, students did not retain their knowledge of sets and recognition of the properties of equality too well. The percents, lost on these topics were 17.2 and 18.5 respectively. Students tended to retain well their knowledge of adding and reducing fractions and working with formulas. The percents lost on these tonics were 12.5 and 8.5 respectively. Students tended to retain very well their knowledge of absolute value, evaluation of expressions, graphing, and word problems on supplementary and complementary angles. The percents lost on these topics were 2.5, 1.7, 4.4, and 2.6 respectively.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

ix, 127 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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