Publication Date

2006

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Giordano, Francesca G.

Degree Name

Ed.D. (Doctor of Education)

Department

Department of Counseling, Adult and Higher Education

LCSH

Educators--Attitudes||Older people--Education--Public opinion

Abstract

This dissertation presents findings of a qualitative study that examined counselors, social workers, and psychologists’ beliefs, perceptions and experiences on aging and how they provided services to older adults 65 years and older. The 13 in-depth interviews were carried out to examine their experiences of providing services to meet their older clients’ mental health needs. This study supports the review of existing literature on what is already known about aging and providing services by mental health practitioners working with older adults. O f the results, 29 themes emerged showing how the practitioners helped and empowered their older clients to learn and deal with their problems effectively. In addition, practitioners encouraged their older clients to alter and modify their daily lifestyle to function and cope with problems. Other themes such as death and dying, endof- life ethical issues, suicide, complexity of managed care, issues with family members, a need for better training, and a host of other presenting concerns that come with aging and working with older adults are discussed. Overall, the findings suggest that there were more similarities than differences between the three practitioners’ perceptions and experiences on aging, in how they provided services working with older adults. A discussion of the study, in regards to how the nature of the study changed between the three groups is noted. Areas for future research were addressed including implications that recommend mental health practitioners to be prepared to meet the upcoming needs and services of older adults.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages [274]-304).

Extent

xiii, 317 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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