Author

Blanche Hill

Publication Date

1961

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Maxwell, Lyle||Maedke, Wilmer O.

Degree Name

M.S. (Master of Science)

Department

Department of Business

LCSH

Shorthand--Study and teaching||Teaching--Aids and devices

Abstract

It was the purpose of this study (1) to determine sources available which describe the shorthand teaching devices now in use; (2) to survey selected shorthand and transcription teaching devices as revealed in the current literature; (3) to determine frequency of use; and (4) to evaluate and determine the effectiveness of selected devices for motivating and skill-building in shorthand and transcription. The survey method of research was used. Shorthand- Transcription Evaluation Check Sheets were mailed to a selected group of secondary shorthand teachers in twenty-one Northern Illinois counties. The city of Chicago was excluded. In this study, shorthand indicated first-year or theory; and transcription referred to second-year short­hand classes. It was found that there are many teaching devices used to facilitate the teaching of shorthand and transcription as indicated in current literature. All devices (36) listed on the Check Sheets had been used in both first- and second-year shorthand. Most-used and least-used devices were almost identical in both years. Six devices, homework, new-matter dictation, short-repetitive dictation, timed dictation, reading dictated notes, and warm-up writing practice, were being used by at least 90 per cent of those teaching shorthand and transcription. The least-used devices were the opaque projector, skits, and flash cards. Each device had been used by only k per cent of the teachers responding. The most-used devices were not necessarily rated as the most effective. In shorthand, homework was being used by the greatest number of teachers, but short-repetitive dictation was rated the most effective. In transcription, timed dictation was the most-used device, but charts received the highest rating for effectiveness. In shorthand, the teachers rated short-repetitive dictation, the chalkboard, and timed dictation the most effective. Charts, mail dictation, and bulletin boards received the highest ratings for effectiveness in transcription. With the exception of the Teacher's Manual which was being used extensively in shorthand, the basic instructional materials--Teacher's Manual, Student's Transcript, and Workbook— were being used by a small percentage of teachers in both first- and second-year classes. Some devices that have received publicity in leading business magazines are not those most used or rated as most effective by the teachers. The record player and the tape recorder were considered very effective teaching aids by the teachers, but they are being used by few teachers. In answer to a discussion-type question to list the kinds of tests used, teachers indicated that they used a variety of tests. Only about half of the thirty-eight devices appearing on the Check Sheet were being used in either shorthand or transcription by at least 50 per cent of the teachers reporting.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

vii, 88 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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