Publication Date

1970

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Johnson, Duane R., 1931-

Degree Name

M.S. (Master of Science)

Department

Department of Industry and Technology

LCSH

Motorcycles

Abstract

Many educators believe learners require teaching approaches to the learner's behavioral characteristics. The purpose of the study was to provide some direction to teaching approaches by deter­mining whether or not there were significant differences in behavioral characteristics between male motorcyclists and non-motorcyclists thirty years of age and under. One-hundred and sixty motorcyclists and one-hundred non­-motorcyclists were surveyed in this study. The subjects responded to the Mann Inventory and a personal data questionnaire. From the Mann Inventory individuals' behavioral characteristics were deter­mined. From the personal data questionnaire individuals' background in motor vehicle operation was determined. There was no significant difference between motorcyclists and non-motorcyclists within the six behavioral categories of the Mann Inventory at the .10 level of confidence according to an analysis by the chi-square test. An analysis comparing responses from the personal data questionnaires indicated that motorcyclists and non-motorcyclists in the Mann Inventory maladjusted-withdrawn category and the maladjusted-vacillating category tended not to enroll in high school driver education. Motorcyclists in the adjusted and the adjusted-withdrawn categories received riding instruction from another person whereas those in the adjusted-aggressive and the three maladjusted categories had generally taught themselves to ride. Over-all, twice the percentage of non-motorcyclists as motorcyclists believed that the wearing of safety helmets should be required for motorcycle riders. Individuals in both Mann withdrawn categories and in the normal category stated that they would wear helmets frequently; individuals in both aggressive categories and in the maladjusted-vacillating category replied they would wear them the least. There was no discernible difference between the motorcyclists and non-motorcyclists in the rate of traffic violations and accidents according to an analysis of Mann behavioral categories.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

vi, 44 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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