Publication Date

2014

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Valentiner, David P.

Degree Name

Ph.D. (Doctor of Philosophy)

Department

Department of Psychology

LCSH

Bashfulness--Treatment||Anxiety--Treatment||Clinical psychology

Abstract

The current study looked to extend previous research on the meta-cognitive variable of shyness mindset. The objectives were to demonstrate the ability to promote an incremental view of shyness in a clinical population, provide evidence for this change's ability to enhance the reduction of social performance anxiety symptoms via exposure therapy, and elucidate the possible mechanisms involved. Participants were recruited from an intensive outpatient program for the treatment of anxiety disorders, and assigned to either receive an intervention designed to alter shyness mindset, or treatment as usual. Results indicated that shyness mindset was malleable in a clinical population. The effect of shyness mindset on social performance anxiety symptoms was less clear, though the most parsimonious interpretation of the data suggested that the two constructs do not have a causal relationship. The mechanisms of any possible relationship remained unclarified.

Comments

Advisors: David P. Valentiner.||Committee members: Amanda Durik; Patrick McGrath; Nina Mounts; Laura D. Pittman; Kevin D. Wu.

Extent

117 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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