Publication Date

2008

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Lovejoy, M. Christine

Degree Name

Ph.D. (Doctor of Philosophy)

Department

Department of Psychology

LCSH

Mother and infant||Infants--Care

Abstract

A model of maternal caregiving was tested that included maternal variables of positive affect, negative affect, parenting self-efficacy, and maternal responsiveness. It was hypothesized that mothers' positive affect would moderate the relationship between maternal negative affect and maternal self-efficacy, and these analyses were tested using both state and trait versions of measures of maternal affect and self-efficacy. Furthermore, the proposed model hypothesized that maternal self-efficacy would mediate the relationship between maternal negative affect and maternal responsiveness, and this hypothesis was tested using both state and trait versions of maternal affect and self-efficacy measures. The model also proposed that maternal positive affect, at both the state and trait levels, would be significantly positively correlated with maternal responsiveness. Participants were 39 mothers and their 11 to 15 month-old children. Mothers completed measures of trait affect and self-efficacy at home, then came to a research lab to complete state versions of these measures, and to participate in a free-play interaction in the lab, where responsiveness was assessed through observations of their interaction. Results of a simultaneous regression analysis showed that positive affect did not moderate the relationship between maternal negative affect and maternal self-efficacy, at either the state or the trait level. Moreover, the mediational hypotheses were not supported by the data. However, significant correlations were found between mothers' positive and negative affect and self-efficacy, with unique findings at the state and trait levels. Finally, both trait positive affect and trait self-efficacy were related to responsive caregiving behavior. These findings were discussed as they relate to the current literature, and implications for future studies were discussed.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages 90-103)

Extent

126 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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