Document Type

Article

Media Type

Text

Abstract

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students need to develop successful rhetorical strategies for dealing with the conflicts that education, community, and society impose upon them. Webbed writing environments provide a place where LGBT students can prepare to deal with those conflicts by: (a) challenging one another, (b) interrogating course plans and materials, and (c) collaborating responses to homophobic discourse. LGBT students more readily construct and rehearse rhetorical strategies online, because they feel freer to represent their sexualities, without the complications or inhibitions that real-time, in-person conversation imposes. However, these strategies are not as productive if LGBT students don’t also get the opportunity to discuss, analyze, and critique their online activity face-to-face, in anticipation of the writing and speaking tasks that they must perform in much less hospitable public environments.

DOI

10.1016/j.compcom.2004.05.004

Publication Date

9-1-2004

Department

Women's Studies Program

ISSN

8755-4615

Language

eng

Publisher

Elsevier

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